Eat Wild Foods Safely

Because wild foods are a traditional part of a Penobscot sustenance diet, DNR scientists analyzed contamination levels in some.  We are thrilled to be sharing the best ways to keep yourself safe when eating them!

Fish FrontScreenshot 2018 04 09Game FrontScreenshot 2018 04 09Plants FrontScreenshot 2018 04 09b

  1. See the sections below for electronic versions and more information
  2. Get a printed copy of the brochures at the Department of Natural Resources main office
  3. Have us mail you a brochure - expand the first section below and fill out the form to provide us with the necessary information

(click on section titles in brown to expand or contract them) 

Because wild foods are a traditional part of a Penobscot sustenance diet, DNR scientists analyzed contamination levels in some.  We are thrilled to be sharing the best ways to keep yourself safe when eating them!

Fish FrontScreenshot 2018 04 09Game FrontScreenshot 2018 04 09Plants FrontScreenshot 2018 04 09b

  1. See the sections below for electronic versions and more information
  2. Get a printed copy of the brochures at the Department of Natural Resources main office
  3. Have us mail you a brochure - expand the first section below and fill out the form to provide us with the necessary information

(click on section titles in brown to expand or contract them) 

Get a brochure mailed to you!

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Fish

  

Click here for a pdf version of this brochure (1,249kb)

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fishadvisory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Click here for a pdf version of this advisory (120kb)

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 Toxic contaminants

Connecting Water Quality with Human Health  

 

Wildlife

 

CADMIUM IN MOOSE AND DEER LIVERS

In 1999, the Penobscot and Passamaquoddy Tribes worked together to collect livers from moose and deer harvested on tribal lands. This work was funded by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and was extremelly valuable to the tribes as moose and deer are subsistence foods for tribal members. Many tribal members reported that traditonally they removed the heart and liver from a moose and ate those organs first.

Cadmium is a heavy metal found in the environment that can cause extreme neurological problems even in low concentrations. Signs of cadmium poisoning include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pains, cramps and organ failure.

Click here for a pdf version of a summary of this study (219 KB)

Current Advisory: Limit intake of deer livers to no more than 1 pound per week. Do not consume moose livers or kidneys.

 Cooking Wild Game